Fashion designs – OZ Springfield http://ozspringfield.com/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 06:34:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ozspringfield.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-1-73x150.png Fashion designs – OZ Springfield http://ozspringfield.com/ 32 32 Shaibal Saha’s desert-influenced fashion designs https://ozspringfield.com/shaibal-sahas-desert-influenced-fashion-designs/ https://ozspringfield.com/shaibal-sahas-desert-influenced-fashion-designs/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/shaibal-sahas-desert-influenced-fashion-designs/ This year’s Apsara Fashion Week highlighted the work of Shaibal Saha, designer at Anjans. A line of sustainable clothing inspired by the waves created in the desert and nature presented in the collection. Saha’s line consisted of six garments, all in neutral and cooler tones, and desert-like colors like beige, off-white, and gold. For all […]]]>

This year’s Apsara Fashion Week highlighted the work of Shaibal Saha, designer at Anjans. A line of sustainable clothing inspired by the waves created in the desert and nature presented in the collection.

Saha’s line consisted of six garments, all in neutral and cooler tones, and desert-like colors like beige, off-white, and gold.

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Behind all of Saha’s work lies the influence and balance of nature. Particularly for the clothes of this line, it imitates the waves created by the desert sand and the gradients that occur in this environment.

The waves and styles of the outfit incorporated a subtle flowing movement that creates the illusion of rhythm in a haunting desert environment. The abstract features of the dresses complement her source of inspiration, making the collection all the more fascinating.

The elegance of each outfit was emphasized by simplistic prints, floral designs and patterns. All six outfits are made from natural fibers. Made from khadi fabric and natural jute, and other natural materials like seashells, all patterns and designs are handcrafted. Each garment is unique in its own way and tells its own story.

All of Saha’s original designs, which take about a month to conceptualize and create, feature subtle color overlaps similar to the layered waves visible in a mirage. Headdresses add a dimension of sophistication and sparkle, bringing the entire outfit together and filling the natural, desert-inspired look from head to toe. Besides outfits and headdresses, shoes, jewelry and accessories are also made of jute.

Saha draws all her inspiration from nature and the events of nature. Not only did he create a bold and elegant collection embodying the intricacies and movements of the desert mirage, but he also used local and sustainable materials. This line is not only unique and breathtaking in its history and inspiration, but also in its designs, materials and creation.

Photo: Uturn Production

Model: Maria, Hira, Mili, Tania, Efa, Nazia

Wardrobe: Shaibal Saha

Make-up: Orko

Coordination: Sonia Yeasmin Isha


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Henry Scott Tuke’s watercolor and fashion designs for Princess Anne are among the five lots to watch out for https://ozspringfield.com/henry-scott-tukes-watercolor-and-fashion-designs-for-princess-anne-are-among-the-five-lots-to-watch-out-for/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 00:05:53 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/henry-scott-tukes-watercolor-and-fashion-designs-for-princess-anne-are-among-the-five-lots-to-watch-out-for/ A watercolor of a bather on a beach by Henry Scott Tuke – estimate £ 10,000-12,000 at Lodge & Thomas. Roland arkell 08 Nov 2021 1. Henry Scott Tuke watercolor Henry Scott Tuke is featured twice in Lodge & Thomas’ inaugural art auction in Truro, Cornwall on November 12. A watercolor of a bather on […]]]>

A watercolor of a bather on a beach by Henry Scott Tuke – estimate £ 10,000-12,000 at Lodge & Thomas.

1. Henry Scott Tuke watercolor

Henry Scott Tuke is featured twice in Lodge & Thomas’ inaugural art auction in Truro, Cornwall on November 12.

A watercolor of a bather on a beach (shown here) is expected to reach £ 10,000-12,000, and an oil on panel by Charlie in his Punt is also offered.

Both paintings are from a local private collection which also includes works by Dame Laura Knight and three paintings from the St Ives School by John Anthony Park. Watch this Henry Scott Tuke via thesaleroom.com.

2. Sampler of the William and Mary group

Woolley & Wallis is selling the contents of Upper Slaughter Manor, the Micheál and Elizabeth Feller collection, in Salisbury from November 9-10.

The sale features a number of fine needlework including this Judith Hayle type William and Mary group sampler. He has the initials IH for Judith Hayle, and the name Marthe Cussen.

The samplers at the school of Judith Hayle have been well documented by Edwina Ehrman. Until recently there were 11 samplers known to students taught by Widow Judith or Iudah Haylem in her hometown of Ipswich. This example, showing the signature cartridges and signature bands and text from a shared directory, is a twelfth.

A candidate for the sewing of this sampler is Martha, daughter of Edmond and Hannah Cousin of Brantham, Suffolk, who would have been around 10 years old when she stepped out with her sampler on August 39, 1696.

Estimate of £ 8,000 to £ 12,000. View this needlework sampler via thesaleroom.com.

3. Fashion designs of Princess Anne

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Fashion designs for Princess Anne from royal couturier Sir Norman Hartnell are arriving at Ewbank’s, including these two examples valued at £ 150-250.

Fashion designs for Princess Anne by royal couturier Sir Norman Hartnell (1901-79) will be auctioned as part of a large archive of designs and other company documents to come at the Ewbank sale in Surrey on November 11.

The drawings and documents, mostly from the 1960s and 1970s, were a personal gift from one of the last owners of the business to the seller.

Among these designs are two original fashion illustrations from the 1970s in watercolor, marked with pen and pencil. HRH Princess Anne. One is in an evening dress adorned with turquoise and white, the other in a lemon trapeze dress with a matching coat.

14 x 10 inch (35.5 x 25 cm) images are priced between £ 150-250. View these sketches by Sir Norman Hartnell via thesaleroom.com.

4. William III silver candlesticks

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Pair of William III silver candlesticks with hallmarks for London 1699 – estimate £ 3000-6000 at Potteries Auctions.

This pair of William III silver candlesticks with hallmarks for London 1699, and maker’s mark SM under a bird, on sale at Potteries Auctions in Stoke-on-Trent from November 11th to 13th.

“In excess of the demands of a magnificent Midlands Hall, and never been to the market for generations,” they are emblazoned with a crest and weigh approximately 24 ounces.

Appraised for insurance 30 years ago for £ 6,000, they have a guide of £ 3,000 to £ 6,000. View these silver candlesticks via thesaleroom.com.

5. Advertising poster

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Original advertising leaflet in lithograph on stone from 1938 for Mossant hats – estimate £ 300-600 from Antikbar.

The sale at poster specialist Antikbar on November 13 includes, estimated between £ 300 and £ 600, this original 1938 stone lithograph advertising sheet for Mossant hats. The jovial drawing on a bright yellow background is by Leonetto Cappiello (1875-1942), the Italian commercial artist who mainly lived and worked in Paris.

Cappiello is now often called “the father of modern advertising” because of his innovation in poster design. He was, for example, the first poster artist to use bold figures emerging from monochrome backgrounds. View this advertising poster via thesaleroom.com.


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Works from Eames to Judy Chicago join iconic fashion designers on the ‘Christian Dior’ journey … https://ozspringfield.com/works-from-eames-to-judy-chicago-join-iconic-fashion-designers-on-the-christian-dior-journey/ https://ozspringfield.com/works-from-eames-to-judy-chicago-join-iconic-fashion-designers-on-the-christian-dior-journey/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 03:29:39 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/works-from-eames-to-judy-chicago-join-iconic-fashion-designers-on-the-christian-dior-journey/ Christian Dior (French, 1905-1957). Costume bar, afternoon ensemble with a jacket in natural ecru shantung and a skirt in black pleated wool crepe. Haute Couture Spring-Summer 1947, Corolle line. Dior Héritage collection, Paris. (Composite scan: Katerina Jebb) The exhibition’s New York premiere Christian Dior: Creator of Dreams traces the revolutionary history and heritage of Maison […]]]>
Christian Dior (French, 1905-1957). Costume bar, afternoon ensemble with a jacket in natural ecru shantung and a skirt in black pleated wool crepe. Haute Couture Spring-Summer 1947, Corolle line. Dior Héritage collection, Paris. (Composite scan: Katerina Jebb)

The exhibition’s New York premiere Christian Dior: Creator of Dreams traces the revolutionary history and heritage of Maison Dior and presents unique pieces drawn mainly from the Dior archives.

Christian Dior: Creator of Dreams explores the more than seventy-year history of Maison Dior with more than two hundred haute couture garments as well as photographs, archival videos, sketches, vintage perfume elements, accessories and works by the collection of the Brooklyn Museum. Displayed in the museum’s magnificent 20,000 square foot Beaux-Arts Courtyard, designed by McKim, Mead & White in 1893, Christian Dior: Creator of Dreams is based on major exhibitions held at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, in 2017, at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, in 2019, and at the Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai, in 2020. The exhibition is curated by specialist Dior Florence Müller,
Avenir Foundation Curator of Textile Art and Fashion, Denver Art Museum, in collaboration with Matthew Yokobosky, Senior Curator of Fashion and Material Culture, Brooklyn Museum, and will be on view from September 10, 2021 to February 20, 2022.

The Brooklyn Museum presentation includes works by great American photographers such as Lillian Bassman, Cass Bird, Henry Clarke, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, William Helburn, Horst P. Horst, William Klein, David LaChapelle, Annie Leibovitz,
Frances McLaughlin-Gill, Gordon Parks, Irving Penn, Karen Radkai and Herb Ritts, with a special presentation of the iconic Dovima with Elephants by Richard Avedon, Evening Dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris (August 1955). In addition, works by Dior and his artistic directors – Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons and Maria Grazia Chiuri – are juxtaposed with works from the Museum’s collection. In one section, a rare blackened ten-panel FSW (Folding Screen Wall) (1946-1955), by Charles Eames and Ray Eames, is exhibited with period Dior motifs. In another section you can see drawings and studies by Judy Chicago, presented with recent drawings by Chiuri. Of particular note is Dior’s one-of-a-kind 1880 Fashion Doll (Afternoon Set), which entered the Brooklyn Museum collection in 1949, making it the first American museum collection to be acquired. a Dior.

Christian Dior with the Sylvie model, circa 1948. Courtesy of Christian Dior

With objects drawn primarily from the Dior archives, the exhibition includes a huge range of haute couture clothing that exemplifies many of the French couturier’s legendary silhouettes, including the “New Look”, which debuted in 1947, just a few months away. before Dior traveled to the United States. United States and open the Christian Dior branch in New York. With its creations widely photographed and featured in leading publications, Dior has become one of the world’s most recognized names in fashion. The exhibition also brings to life Dior’s many sources of inspiration, from the splendor of flowers and other natural forms to classical and contemporary art, which will influence the creators of Maison Dior for decades. A canvas room, a tribute to the Ateliers, and adjacent galleries of couture clothes showcase the excellence of Dior’s little hands. The central atrium of the Court of Fine Arts has been redesigned into an enchanted garden, and a final gallery features many famous dresses worn by movie stars from Grace Kelly to Jennifer Lawrence.

The presentation also explores the evolution of Maison Dior through the vision of its subsequent artistic directors, from Yves Saint Laurent, whose key influences included the beatniks and the 1953 film The Wild One, to Marc Bohan and his reign as nearly thirty years during the revolutionary 1960s and 1970s, as well as the 1980s, when Bohan drew
inspiration from Jackson Pollock. Other creations by art directors include architectural designs by Gianfranco Ferré from the 1990s; John Galliano’s reinvention of Dior silhouettes inspired by works as diverse as Egyptian sculpture and paintings by Giovanni Boldini; Raf Simons’ own minimalist take on original Dior designs; and pieces by the current and first artistic director of the Dior women’s collections, Maria Grazia Chiuri, who brought a new vision to the historic fashion house. Notably, in 2016, Chiuri launched T-shirts featuring Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s statement! “We should all be feminists” and pledged to have the official images of every new collection photographed by women. As the only major museum in the country to have galleries and a collection dedicated to feminist art – the Sackler Center – the Brooklyn Museum is uniquely suited to an exploration of Chiuri’s groundbreaking initiatives to defend
creative women.

Montage in a Christian Dior-New York salon with (from left to right) Christian Dior, Raymonde Zehnacker, Marguerite Carré, Mme Knoll and Mizza Bricard, 1948 Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives. BMA artist files

Florence Müller, Curator of Textile Art and Fashion for the Fondation Avenir at the Denver Art Museum, said: “As early as 1947, with his famous ‘New Look’ collection, Christian Dior transformed his sudden notoriety into an international expansion of his Maison, becoming a forerunner of contemporary globalized fashion. The opening of the first New York branch in 1948 was a prelude to this worldwide fame. Following the presentation of Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams in Paris and London, the new Brooklyn Museum exhibition pays tribute to this unique historical fashion adventure initiated between Paris and New York.

“The Brooklyn Museum has long recognized important contributions to the history of fashion design, from The Story of Silk (1934) to the innovative Of Men Only (1976) to the recent Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion (2019 ) and now Christian. Dior: Creator of Dreams. Each exemplifies the power of fashion to influence and change visual culture as a whole, ”says Matthew Yokobosky, senior curator of fashion and material culture, Brooklyn Museum. “Today, the work of Maria Grazia Chiuri has reshaped the Dior dream for a new generation, with a worldview that brings with it inclusiveness and respect as key philosophical guidelines. We couldn’t be more excited to present these innovative, alluring and technically exceptional designs to our audience.


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Meet the Pittsburgh Artist Behind Electric Cat Fashion Designs | Fashion | Pittsburgh https://ozspringfield.com/meet-the-pittsburgh-artist-behind-electric-cat-fashion-designs-fashion-pittsburgh/ https://ozspringfield.com/meet-the-pittsburgh-artist-behind-electric-cat-fashion-designs-fashion-pittsburgh/#respond Wed, 18 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/meet-the-pittsburgh-artist-behind-electric-cat-fashion-designs-fashion-pittsburgh/ Click to enlarge Photo of the CP: Kaycee Orwig Masha Vereshchenko poses with her art at Boheme in Lawrenceville. Masha Vereshchenko crosses her legs as she sits on Boheme’s window sill in Lawrenceville with Bat, her little 7 month old Chihuahua who enthusiastically climbs on top of her. She is dressed in black, but her […]]]>

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Photo of the CP: Kaycee Orwig

Masha Vereshchenko poses with her art at Boheme in Lawrenceville.

Masha Vereshchenko crosses her legs as she sits on Boheme’s window sill in Lawrenceville with Bat, her little 7 month old Chihuahua who enthusiastically climbs on top of her. She is dressed in black, but her modern neon yellow mullet and red eyeshadow are juxtaposed against her dark outfit, much like her own work of art.

Vereshchenko considered herself an artist before she even remembered it. From her birth in Russia to her childhood in Detroit to her last 20 years in Pittsburgh, the South Side artist has matured with her talents and is now the fashion designer and owner of Electric Cat Shop.

“It’s my twisted sense of humor mixed with pop culture,” Vereshchenko says of his designs.

Boheme, located at 5156 Butler St., is an indoor market that opened in July 2021, featuring a variety of local artists and vendors looking for an in-person location. Each business is separated into small sections of the building. Electric Cat is one of the other stores that sell items such as vintage clothing, handmade soaps and candles.

The corner section of Vereshchenko in Bohemia faces a window facing Butler Street, allowing people to peek at his designs from the sidewalks. Her work easily catches the eye with a vibrant color palette and cutting-edge designs that she uses in the majority of her work.

Click to enlarge Electric cat jewelry on display at Boheme in Lawrenceville - PR PHOTO: KAYCEE ORWIG

Photo of the CP: Kaycee Orwig

Electric cat jewelry on display at Boheme in Lawrenceville

The wall in Vereshchenko’s section is painted in large waves of orange, pink and blue pastels resembling a melting rainbow sherbet on a hot summer day. The front of the section is filled with colorful shelves that match the pastel waves and contains an abundance of hand-painted earrings, necklaces, prints of paintings and vests, all designed and made by Vereshchenko.

She says she incorporates a lot of dark humor into her work, which can be seen in her earrings resembling Chinese porcelain teacups spilling blood and large earrings that read “Fuck Off.” In cursive letters.

“I started by buying molds and resin on Etsy, but these are not my designs. They’re just pre-made molds, and I’m just putting on colors, basically, ”Vereshchenko says of her jewelry designs. “But as soon as I did enough, I got a makerspace subscription so I could use a laser cutter.”

Vereshchenko first uses Adobe Illustrator to virtually design her necklaces and earrings, then uses a laser cutter on an acrylic base or recycled material to turn her designs into jewelry.

In addition to designing and making jewelry, Vereshchenko also hand-painted clothes like leather jackets, using empty sleeves and backs as canvas. An impressive blue and green gradient jacket accented with monster mouths with sharp teeth and eyes took him a month to paint.

Vereshchenko says she is not as focused on painting clothes as she creates jewelry, due to the immense time it takes to complete the projects, while not selling the clothes for what they are worth. .

“I try to establish the little things first, that it can be my bread and butter, while the good buyers come and buy my artwork, my jackets and everything,” she says.

Although Vereshchenko is now able to make Electric Cat his main focus and his full-time job, it was not always so.

“I have a tough and brutal past and you know it’s never going to go away. But that’s me, and why that made me interesting, ”says Vereshchenko.

Prior to her efforts for Electric Cat, Vereshchenko’s art was mainly painting, which she says was very difficult to live with. Although his paintings may have traveled to showcases around the world, they have not been able to make ends meet.

“In my twenties, I ended up pretty much like an alcoholic and just depressed,” she says. “I was spending all my money on art supplies and alcohol, and that was my life.”

Years later, at the age of 30, Vereshchenko says she made an effort to change her life, get sober, and continue therapy. It was also at this time that she became interested in photography and drag queens, muses of her work and her personal fashion.

Vereshchenko says she used to photograph drag queens at local clubs and bars around Pittsburgh, like Blue Moon in Lawrenceville, and fell in love with the fashion and makeup incorporated into drag.

Although Vereshchenko does not personally perform in drag shows, she still dresses extravagantly, accented with extravagant makeup when attending events and looks like a work of art herself. As many drag queens tend to design their own outfits, Vereshchenko creates bespoke pieces that they can include in their wardrobes.

Click to enlarge Electric cat jewelry on display at Boheme in Lawrenceville

Electric cat jewelry on display at Boheme in Lawrenceville

Electric cat jewelry on display at Boheme in Lawrenceville

And while there are dark themes associated with Vereshchenko’s jewelry and clothing, she says the colors she uses are often vibrant compared to her previous work.

“My painting I did when I was deeply depressed – it was mostly just to vent and bring it all out. So it was dark, bitter and disgusting, ”says Vereshchenko.

When Vereshchenko got sober, she says she had a creative block where she couldn’t paint anymore.

“I’m happy now,” Vereshchenko says as she sits in her shop, surrounded by pops of color.


Electric cat shop. 5156 Butler Street, Lawrenceville. electriccat.ninja and instagram.com/electriccatshop



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Fashion, Design & Cultural Appropriation | Morung Express https://ozspringfield.com/fashion-design-cultural-appropriation-morung-express/ https://ozspringfield.com/fashion-design-cultural-appropriation-morung-express/#respond Fri, 13 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/fashion-design-cultural-appropriation-morung-express/ Fab India’s use of Naga cultural motifs and materials attracts criticism Morung Express newsDimapur | Aug 13 Cultural appropriation of Naga cultural material has existed for a long time. One example is the 1972 Bollywood film “Ye Gulistan Hamara” depicting a tribal community living along the border with China where the actress was seen wearing […]]]>

Fab India’s use of Naga cultural motifs and materials attracts criticism

Morung Express news
Dimapur | Aug 13

Cultural appropriation of Naga cultural material has existed for a long time. One example is the 1972 Bollywood film “Ye Gulistan Hamara” depicting a tribal community living along the border with China where the actress was seen wearing a Sumi Naga shawl. The film was banned from showing in Nagaland because the Ao community opposed the song “Mera Naam Aao”, and even the Naga Student Federation staged a huge protest against it. Another example is that of actor Mithun Chakraborty who was seen wearing a female Naga shawl in one of his films.

The Oxford Dictionary defines cultural appropriation as “the unrecognized or inappropriate adoption of customs, practices, ideas, etc. of one people or society by members of another generally more dominant people or society”.

Outside of Bollywood, the Naga Company has also witnessed an increase in incidences of cultural appropriation in the fashion industry.

The “FabNU” collection of clothing brand Fab India has been criticized. On Friday, the board of directors of Nagaland Handloom & Handicrafts Development Corporation Limited (NHHDC Ltd) released a statement, noting that Fab India’s new collection includes a ‘Folkdelic’ category containing Naga prints and Naga inspired prints. without any authorization. , collaboration with local artisans or any type of credit granted to any Naga tribe or organization.

As an exception, the board noted that the collection not only uses Naga prints without permission, but also depicts male warriors on clothing intended for women.

“Naga prints and patterns have evolved over the centuries and are gender and tribe specific and are passed down from generation to generation. be stopped immediately, ”said the board.

He said that the big fashion magazines in India like Elle and Vogue have published articles on this new collection but no mention was made of Nagaland or the Nagas, the obvious source of inspiration for this collection.

In this regard, the Managing Director of NHHDC Ltd Zakabo V Rotokha said that the board will pursue the matter with the appropriate authority so that such cases do not recur. Council further urged Tribal Hohos and Women Hohos and stakeholders to exercise extreme caution when collaborating, partnering with individual and commercial entities on similar issues. He said that permission, when granted, should only be granted for a specific event or period, not perpetually.

At the time of filing this report, Fab India has not responded to messages from this newspaper requesting the company’s response.

“Not the first time”
NHHDC Ltd noted that this was not the first time that traditional Naga outfits, adornments and patterns were misused and appropriated by non-Naga. He said the Nagaland government had in the past written to the Ministry of Tribal Affairs to inform them that Naga cultural clothing is gender-specific and sacrosanct to Naga society and that “any display or use in any form whatsoever it may have serious repercussions on society ”, unless written permission is obtained from the indigenous source.

Researcher Talilula is of the opinion that “when a so-called ‘awake’ brand like Fab India undoubtedly uses indigenous Naga designs in their clothing, but still out of ignorance chooses to label them as ‘dobby print skirt’ and “Linen print dress” on their website is a straight case of cultural misappropriation / appropriation. This not only dissociates symbolic conceptions from its source community, but also erases their cultural identity, she claimed.

Respect and understand indigenous conceptions
Commenting on the issue of plagiarism of indigenous designs, Sharon Longchari said that “designers must respect and understand the importance of cultural and indigenous designs as intellectual property. These aren’t just pretty pattern designs – they usually carry deeper symbolism and stories. “

Longchari also pointed out that a brand called Bamboo Tree Jewelry on the Myntra shopping site sells a line of jewelry that is exact replicas of necklaces worn by Konyak Nagas. Furniture wholesalers in Rajasthan and other parts of India are taking advantage of the growing popularity of indigenous tribal furniture and have learned to reproduce and mass produce it for export as antique furniture from Nagaland, a- she added.

Go forward
Ngutoli Y Swu, assistant professor in the history department of Zunheboto Government College, noted with relief that the Naga society “speaks up and is angry with the cultural appropriation that is happening and has started to fight for what is ours.” .

She stressed that cultural appropriation has a long-term effect on people and their cultural heritage. “We must look for ways to prevent such incidents from happening again in the future,” she said.

Swu suggested that tribal organizations should take steps to properly document Naga textiles as well as ornaments, publish manuals on their proper use, and opt for geographical indication labels where possible.

The government can encourage the Nagas researchers by funding them to document the cultural heritage of their respective tribes and the researchers, in turn, can educate the knowledge keepers on the appropriate means of disseminating information outside the community, a she added.

Taking the example of a practice started by the Lazami Cultural Society, from Lazami Village in Zunheboto District, Swu said village councils should keep records of people visiting their villages, as well as the purpose of their visit. and what they plan to do with the information, if put together.

Each village can imitate this practice and can even go so far as to sign obligations not to abuse or misinterpret the information collected and the state government can support this type of practice by providing financial aid to these villages. It is a means by which cultural appropriation can be controlled to some extent, she suggested.

“Naga cultural clothing is sacrosanct for Naga society”

Dimapur, Aug 13 (MExN): Nagaland Handloom & Handicrafts Development Corporation Limited (NHHDC Ltd) issued a statement on Friday expressing serious concern about the conflict of interest between the Chakhesang Women Welfare Society (CWWS) and Indian designer Ritika Mittal regarding “breach of agreement” and the use of Chakhesang textile without proper consent and accreditation.

Citing press reports on the matter, the board of directors of NHHDC Ltd noted that “this is not the first time that traditional Naga outfits, ornaments and patterns have been misused and appropriated by foreigners, it is ie non-Nagas ”. In light of such cases, the board said that the Nagaland government previously wrote to the Indian government’s Department of Tribal Affairs, stating that “Naga cultural clothing is gender specific and sacrosanct to Naga society. “.

“The same further explained that unless you get written permission from the native source, any posting or use in any form can create serious repercussions in society. Subsequently, the Ministry of Tribal Affairs was requested to refrain from any illegitimate practices relating to traditional Naga attire, etc. », Indicates the press release.

In the present tangle, the board has stated that the CWWS has, in particular, all legal rights and protection against outside intrusion and, as such, strongly denounced “the unwarranted action of the designer and at the same time called upon to guarantee against the exploitation and misuse of Naga traditional outfits, ornaments and patterns.

In addition, the board of directors appreciated the CWWS for the GI branding of its traditional shawls and weaves in 2017 and expressed the hope that the rest of the Nagas would also take similar initiatives sooner rather than later.


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Thierry Mugler’s craziest fashion designs from the 90s https://ozspringfield.com/thierry-muglers-craziest-fashion-designs-from-the-90s/ https://ozspringfield.com/thierry-muglers-craziest-fashion-designs-from-the-90s/#respond Tue, 27 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/thierry-muglers-craziest-fashion-designs-from-the-90s/ Thierry Mugler is one of the most prolific fashion designers of the 1980s and 1990s. For two decades, the French designer helped shape an era of colorful catwalks with artistically sculpted and larger-than-life designs. More recently, Thierry Mugler and his eponymous brand have experienced a renaissance as stars like Cardi B and Kim Kardashian are […]]]>

Thierry Mugler is one of the most prolific fashion designers of the 1980s and 1990s. For two decades, the French designer helped shape an era of colorful catwalks with artistically sculpted and larger-than-life designs. More recently, Thierry Mugler and his eponymous brand have experienced a renaissance as stars like Cardi B and Kim Kardashian are often seen wearing his archival designs – and we couldn’t help but indulge in finding the fashion designs. the most exaggerated of Mugler of the 90s.

It was in 2019 when Mugler charmed the influential set of Instagram villains. Cardi B showed up at the 2019 Grammys in a 1995 Mugler Couture oyster dress inspired by 1480s painting The birth of Venus by Botticelli. The following year, the “WAP” singer wore a sheer Mugler dress to the 2020 Grammys. Kim Kardashian is also a big fan of the fetish fashion designer and wore a Mugler body sculpting drop dress to the 2019 Met Gala inspired of the character of Sophia Loren in the 1957 film. Boy on a dolphin. Later that year, Kardashian again picked Mugler for the 2019 Hollywood Beauty Awards and Megan Fox wore a black, cutout design similar to the 2021 Billboard Music Awards.

Want to discover the most incredible creations of Thierry Mugler? Read on ahead of time.


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Robot scrolls through St. Clair students’ fashion designs on the runway https://ozspringfield.com/robot-scrolls-through-st-clair-students-fashion-designs-on-the-runway/ https://ozspringfield.com/robot-scrolls-through-st-clair-students-fashion-designs-on-the-runway/#respond Tue, 15 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/robot-scrolls-through-st-clair-students-fashion-designs-on-the-runway/ Breadcrumb Links Local News Author of the article: Marie Caton St. Clair College Fashion Design Technician Program Coordinator and Professor Elaine Chatwood adjusts a dress during the virtual workshop fashion show at the school on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Due to pandemic restrictions , a robot was used to present the creations of the graduate […]]]>

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Organize a fashion show without makeup, hairstyle and even models?

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No problem.

Elaine Chatwood, Coordinator of the Fashion Design Program at St. Clair College, faced several challenges in her efforts to organize an end-of-year fashion show for graduates.

Restrictions around the COVID-19 pandemic prevented Chatwood from hosting the annual event last spring, but she was determined not to let it happen again.

“I felt so bad for the students last year, they work so hard.” Chatwood said. “This show is such a big part of their portfolios.”

I really wanted movement on stage

So Chatwood began to think about ways to host a fashion show under all health and safety restrictions. She initially considered using forms for clothing coming down a factory assembly line and even considered tyrolating the forms from point to point.

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Then she saw a TV commercial for these disc-shaped robotic vacuum cleaners and asked her colleague Al Douglas from the robotics program if anything could be adapted for the task.

St. Clair College cameraman Mike Poirier is filming the virtual workshop fashion show at the school on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Due to pandemic restrictions, a robot was used to showcase the designs of the children. graduate students.
St. Clair College cameraman Mike Poirier is filming the virtual workshop fashion show at the school on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Due to pandemic restrictions, a robot was used to showcase the designs of the children. graduate students. Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star

Douglas suggested the college’s recently purchased Autonomous Guided Vehicle (AGV) for research projects. It was sturdy enough to safely move industrial clothing forms that would display a student’s drawing.

It all came together inside the Student Life Center on Tuesday where 65 pieces of clothing rolled down the track atop the AGV as video cameras rolled.

Douglas guided the AGV by remote control, taking the shape of the robe down the length of the track where he turned left then right, made a full rotation and headed back.

“It looks pretty good,” Douglas said of the robotic replacement.

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Chatwood was delighted to offer the students the chance to show off their talents. She even showcased 13 designs from the 2020 class to go with 2021 graduates and the top 10 applications from freshman design students.

Getting the clothes moving instead of just being photographed was crucial, Chatwood said.
“I really wanted movement on stage,” she said. “You have to see how the clothes drape and move and you have to see the front and back. “

Cindy Nguyen, left, and Maddie Bevacqua, fashion design students at St. Clair College, put the finishing touches on the dresses during the school's virtual studio fashion show on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Due to pandemic restrictions, a robot was used to showcase the creations.  graduate students.
Cindy Nguyen, left, and Maddie Bevacqua, fashion design students at St. Clair College, put the finishing touches on the dresses during the school’s virtual studio fashion show on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Due to pandemic restrictions, a robot was used to showcase the creations. graduate students. Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star

Pre-COVID, the fashion show would feature a live audience and judges to establish an overall winning design.

Chatwood and her team will edit the video shot on Tuesday and send it to several designers for judging so that a winner can be declared on June 25 when the fashion show airs at 8 p.m. on the link at stclaircollege.ca /workshop.

“There may never have been a perfect example of St. Clair’s role as a college of applied arts and technology,” President Patti France said in a statement. “Few programs are as creative and artistic as fashion design, and not as technologically advanced as robotics, and here we have both exhibited simultaneously. I look forward to this ingenious exhibition and hope the public will enjoy it too.

mcaton@postmedia.com

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The St. Clair College Fashion Design Technicians Virtual Workshop Fashion Show is presented at the school on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Due to pandemic restrictions, a robot was used to showcase the designs graduate students.
The St. Clair College Fashion Design Technicians Virtual Workshop Fashion Show is presented at the school on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Due to pandemic restrictions, a robot was used to showcase the designs graduate students. Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star
Maddie Bevacqua, left, a fashion design engineering student at St. Clair College, and instructor Lori Moore place a mannequin on a robot during the School's Virtual Workshop fashion show on Tuesday, June 15, 2021 Due to the restrictions associated with the pandemic, a robot was used to present drawings to graduate students.
Maddie Bevacqua, left, a fashion design engineering student at St. Clair College, and instructor Lori Moore place a mannequin on a robot during the School’s Virtual Workshop fashion show on Tuesday, June 15, 2021 Due to the restrictions associated with the pandemic, a robot was used to present drawings to graduate students. Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star

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St. Pete’s Dalí Museum hosts virtual event showcasing student fashion designs https://ozspringfield.com/st-petes-dali-museum-hosts-virtual-event-showcasing-student-fashion-designs/ https://ozspringfield.com/st-petes-dali-museum-hosts-virtual-event-showcasing-student-fashion-designs/#respond Wed, 24 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/st-petes-dali-museum-hosts-virtual-event-showcasing-student-fashion-designs/ ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (WFLA) – The Salvador Dalí Museum is hosting a virtual event this week that will showcase the talents of 24 high school students from the Fashion Design at The Dalí program. “This year’s topic was the influence of Dali’s art in filmmaking and a lot of people don’t know he worked on […]]]>

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (WFLA) – The Salvador Dalí Museum is hosting a virtual event this week that will showcase the talents of 24 high school students from the Fashion Design at The Dalí program.

“This year’s topic was the influence of Dali’s art in filmmaking and a lot of people don’t know he worked on a movie, but he did it for a short time,” Annie said. Elise, a high school student.

The free program teaches students how to create wearable art designs for 12 weeks.

“I was very lucky to grow up in a studio that offered dance, music and theater and I was very lucky to be able to explore all of these things there. So just trying everything I fell in love with the theater and from there I fell in love with the costumes and it kind of brought me here, ”said Sofia Pickford, a high school student.

Students also learn the fundamentals of designing, building and presenting tracks from experienced artists and designers.

The program is now in its fourth year. The judges will review the designs and announce the winners in eight categories. The winners’ creations will be exhibited at the Neiman Marcus International Plaza.

The free student fashion film can be viewed on March 25 at 7 p.m. You can register to watch the virtual premiere on the museum’s website.


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45 young entrepreneurs are trained in styling https://ozspringfield.com/45-young-entrepreneurs-are-trained-in-styling/ https://ozspringfield.com/45-young-entrepreneurs-are-trained-in-styling/#respond Tue, 23 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/45-young-entrepreneurs-are-trained-in-styling/ The training was organized by the International Trade Center (TIC) through its youth empowerment projects, Andandorr and She Trades. The training was designed to expose these future fashion entrepreneurs to a career path, giving them the opportunity to harness and exploit their talents. Addressing the closing ceremony, Anna Wadda from the Ministry of Commerce, representing […]]]>

The training was organized by the International Trade Center (TIC) through its youth empowerment projects, Andandorr and She Trades. The training was designed to expose these future fashion entrepreneurs to a career path, giving them the opportunity to harness and exploit their talents.

Addressing the closing ceremony, Anna Wadda from the Ministry of Commerce, representing She Trade Project in The Gambia, revealed that it took some time to find a good consultant to conduct the training.

“I really hope it was very beneficial because you learned a lot, as we realized at the start of the project in terms of fashion, some things were pushed back.”

She said that when it comes to making The Gambia a fashion product, it is necessary to bring in someone who can finally work with the most starchy foods to ensure that the country’s fashion products will be in high demand. able to compete both nationally and internationally.

“We are going to do an evaluation of this training as what you do in the future and also some of the gaps that you have experienced in the training.”

Mamadou Diop Diallow, general manager of MO-STYLE said he was delighted to be part of the training, saying that he has led so many trainings but that the difference he has seen this time makes him happy.

He urged the participants to make good use of the knowledge gained during the training to further develop the fashion and also train other people.

Raimund A. Moser, representative of the International Trade Center (ITC) in The Gambia, said they were very happy to support such an initiative over the past four years, noting that they had invested in the International Trade Center and the youth empowerment project in different fields. .

“We looked at the design aspects and its quality, the partnership and also helped the different stakeholders in getting organized as well as the business links, because all these different things have to come together if we are to be successful as an industry in The Gambia. . “

“In The Gambia, we don’t have a problem with the market, but the problem we have is the supply of the products because internationally the demand for the products is higher, but we have to make sure the step up with the quality and produce the right number of products on time ”.

Participant Rebecca Oli Jallow thanked the organizers for the foresight in organizing such an important training to equip them with the skills needed in life.

“We have gained experience in our business, particularly in cutting patterns and using materials during training.


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Speed ​​Art Museum’s latest exhibit features ornate fashion designs, all made of paper https://ozspringfield.com/speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bart-museums-latest-exhibit-features-ornate-fashion-designs-all-made-of-paper/ https://ozspringfield.com/speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bart-museums-latest-exhibit-features-ornate-fashion-designs-all-made-of-paper/#respond Sun, 21 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bart-museums-latest-exhibit-features-ornate-fashion-designs-all-made-of-paper/ The latest exhibit from the Speed ​​Art Museum is the one you have to see in person to be believed. What looks like ornate dresses from centuries past made of silk, buttons and pearls, are really all made of paper. New Speed ​​Museum exhibit features intricate paper costumes Click to enlarge FOLLOWING Isabelle de Borchgrave […]]]>

The latest exhibit from the Speed ​​Art Museum is the one you have to see in person to be believed. What looks like ornate dresses from centuries past made of silk, buttons and pearls, are really all made of paper.

New Speed ​​Museum exhibit features intricate paper costumes

FOLLOWING

FOLLOWING

Isabelle de Borchgrave took paintings as far back as the 1700s and turned them into entirely paper drawings.

“What she did was not just create a sculpture, but figure out ‘how could I find the paper, process the paper, fold it, turn it into these incredibly ornate costumes,” “said Stephen Reily, Director of the Speed ​​Art Museum.

The Belgian artist took 2D images and brought them into the 3D sphere. Twenty years ago, de Borchgrave began to take a close look at fashion in paintings and began to reproduce the pieces as sculpture.



a room filled with furniture and a vase of flowers on a table


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This includes dresses and costumes across the centuries and across the world. But it didn’t stop there, she also included accessories like handbags and shoes.

It’s about taking art and turning it into another work of art in the form of fashion. You will get a feel for what people wore at a given time in a very complex and detailed way.

“It really makes you look at painting differently,” Reily said. “Thinking about history, the history of art, through these amazing and incredibly imaginative works of paper sculpture,” said Reily.

This collection will be on display at the Speed ​​Art Museum until August, exuding a sense of whimsy during a difficult time.






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“We love to share this exhibit with the community, just to come and enjoy the pure fantasy of the imagination and the art at a time when we need a little of that,” said Reily.

You can book tickets online. The Speed ​​Art Museum is open on Friday, Saturday and Sunday in March.

Contact reporter Rose McBride at rmcbride@whas11.com. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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