Fashion advertising – OZ Springfield http://ozspringfield.com/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 16:41:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ozspringfield.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-1-73x150.png Fashion advertising – OZ Springfield http://ozspringfield.com/ 32 32 Should we ban fashion advertising? https://ozspringfield.com/should-we-ban-fashion-advertising/ https://ozspringfield.com/should-we-ban-fashion-advertising/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 03:28:25 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/should-we-ban-fashion-advertising/ One of the main issues preventing clothes from becoming “durable” is the rate of consumption. Consumption has overtaken population growth as the greatest threat to the planet; more and more people are buying, as new fashion products are aggressively marketed to people online and offline. Faced with the climate crisis, is it time to ban […]]]>

One of the main issues preventing clothes from becoming “durable” is the rate of consumption. Consumption has overtaken population growth as the greatest threat to the planet; more and more people are buying, as new fashion products are aggressively marketed to people online and offline. Faced with the climate crisis, is it time to ban fashion advertising? In this panel discussion, we will explore this question by examining what a world without fashion advertising would look like. Could this wean people off of fast fashion and the planned obsolescence so manly in the contemporary fashion landscape? What would happen to the skills of the people in this space? What would the media landscape look like? How would people develop their style if they strayed from relentless marketing? Presented by SVA Continuing Education.

Moderated by Shonagh marshall, faculty member of SVA MPS Fashion Photography; Curator, writer and founder of Denier, a bimonthly newsletter that explores fashion during the Anthropocene era.

Instagram: @shonaghmarshall

Panelists:

Aja barber, Instagram activist, writer and influencer. Barber writes and talks about issues that underlie fashion and sustainability, such as colonialism, oppression and planned obsolescence. She is a supporter of buying less and is a reformed fast fashion shopper. She has written a book due out in September titled Consumed: on colonialism, climate change, consumerism and the need for collective change.

Instagram: @ajabarber

Willow Defebaugh, writer and co-founder of Atmos magazine. Atmos aims to tell stories about the climate crisis through the prism of art and culture. They aim to have a different approach to fashion promotion in the magazine space.

Instagram: @willowrites

Shazia Abji, experienced designer and North American manager of Overview, a creative collective dedicated to social change. A Glimpse project took all the ads off a London Underground station and replaced them with pictures of cats – because cats are good for us and ads don’t!

Instagram: @wegimpse

Charlie engman, fashion photographer and designer. Engman has photographed campaigns for Nike, Adidas, Stella McCartney, Hermes, Pucci, Vivienne Westwood and for editorials for fashion magazines such as Vogue, T and Another. Along with photography, he co-designed the Collina strada fashion collections, aiming to be as “sustainable” as possible. He also visited the Kantamanto Market in Accra, Ghana, one of the largest second-hand markets selling unwanted clothing in the North. This research has resulted in an existential reflection on how his images sell clothes we don’t need, while waste and consumption are central issues in the climate crisis.

Instagram: @charlieengman



Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/should-we-ban-fashion-advertising/feed/ 0
Welcome to the new golden age of fashion advertising https://ozspringfield.com/welcome-to-the-new-golden-age-of-fashion-advertising/ https://ozspringfield.com/welcome-to-the-new-golden-age-of-fashion-advertising/#respond Thu, 22 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/welcome-to-the-new-golden-age-of-fashion-advertising/ This is the first project of Jacob Jordan, an Apple and Thom Browne and Vuitton alumnus who joined the brand full-time in March 2020 as Global Chief Merchant and Product Strategist. Asked about the connection between The Preston Project and his own role, Jordan said the brand’s legacy “is as important as ever. And not […]]]>

This is the first project of Jacob Jordan, an Apple and Thom Browne and Vuitton alumnus who joined the brand full-time in March 2020 as Global Chief Merchant and Product Strategist. Asked about the connection between The Preston Project and his own role, Jordan said the brand’s legacy “is as important as ever. And not just for us as a brand, but we think it’s still very important to the consumer. So how do you take this DNA and reinvent it? In the past, Calvin Klein was so associated with sensuality and youthful spirit and loved all of these things. So what does that mean now?

As a result, rather than clothes, the keystone of the project is a monumental campaign with vibrant video and footage by Renell Medrano. Like the brand’s original and much-loved iconography, featuring Kate Moss and Marky Mark in their underwear, it’s meticulously and almost stunning, with Lil Uzi Vert freestyle, Nas peeling an orange, Kaia Gerber sitting in the room. bathing in underwear, plus others like GQ contributor Joe Holder, Preston himself and skater Stevie Williams. Oh, and supermodel Ashley Graham! He’s got that ranch house, that rug shag vibe, but without the creepy perversity of the famous Bruce Weber photos. (For this ambiance, see ERL.) Simons did a bit of that too – remember when he put the Kardashians in the barn? But it was, well, a little too intellectual to be true CK. The genius of Calvin Klein ads was their utter, straightforward simplicity. Preston’s clothing is tailor-made to support the creation of this imagery. These are clothes for an epic campaign.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

Perhaps we are entering a new golden age of fashion advertising. The brands seem optimistic about the image possibilities. Last weekend, Balenciaga released a pre-fall collection with video that did not feature any of their clothes but instead a series of scientifically proven clips to make the viewer happy. It was utterly, mightily insane, playing with the overarching, sinister, and vague vocabulary used by almost every tech company these days. More optimistic was the first campaign released by Los Angeles brand Rhude, with Future in the brand’s chic streetwear. Rhude has a billboard in Los Angeles, but otherwise they don’t have distribution plans for the images, which are something between a magazine editorial and a lookbook. The Future photo is an advertisement for publicity.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

In a way, Calvin Klein was the first brand where clothes were the least important part. This is increasingly the industry standard. Preston described going into the archives and finding not only clothes, but a chair, perfume, a whole piece of campaign images and fan letters to Calvin. “It was like a museum,” he said. And with that in mind, he’s created the kind of capsule collection that’s perfect for our time: some very sophisticated museum products.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

Courtesy of Renell Medrano.

Courtesy of Renell Medrano for Heron Preston and Calvin Klein

This story has been updated.



Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/welcome-to-the-new-golden-age-of-fashion-advertising/feed/ 0
How deepfakes could change fashion advertising https://ozspringfield.com/how-deepfakes-could-change-fashion-advertising/ https://ozspringfield.com/how-deepfakes-could-change-fashion-advertising/#respond Mon, 11 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/how-deepfakes-could-change-fashion-advertising/ Like a growing number of marketers and investors, Dhillon emphasizes the “absolutely positive” applications of technology. As Covid-19 blocks restrict in-person activities and advertisers explore digital technologies, deepfakes have significant potential for experiential marketing. Face swap technology, which once took weeks to complete, can now be done in minutes with “Hollywood quality” output, according to […]]]>

Like a growing number of marketers and investors, Dhillon emphasizes the “absolutely positive” applications of technology. As Covid-19 blocks restrict in-person activities and advertisers explore digital technologies, deepfakes have significant potential for experiential marketing. Face swap technology, which once took weeks to complete, can now be done in minutes with “Hollywood quality” output, according to Reface co-founder Dima Shvets.

Experiential marketing tends to be associated with the physical environment, such as pop-up stores, but deepfake technology can bring experiential marketing online, directly to consumers, says Dhillon. Examples could include interactive fashion weeks or gaming experiences, he says.

Dynamic influencer marketing

Dynamic campaigns (the term for large-scale micro-targeted advertising) are becoming a key tool in a marketer’s arsenal. Deepfakes have the potential to help brands reach customers with highly targeted and personalized messages. For influencers and celebrities, deepfakes help them easily expand their reach by agreeing to run a fashion ad campaign and model clothes without even showing up for a photoshoot. Millions of different deepfake ads can be served instantly on platforms like Facebook, while up to 100 different influencer ads targeted to various audiences can be served, says Simon Lejeune, growth marketing consultant.

This isn’t a giant leap in a world where digital identities like gaming avatars already overlap with real identities, while CGI models mix with real life influencers. Imagine a new type of agreement, where an influencer provides a brand with a 15-minute sample of audio content and a few video shots. Using deepfake technology, a brand can turn that content into thousands of hyper-targeted ads. “Influencers could start laying off their faces and voices to brands,” says Lejeune. “A computer can take their faces and voices and reproduce them in 16 different languages ​​or poses, and select the most compelling.”

Over the past year, brands have turned to acquiring licenses and rights to use content produced by influencers and using the content as advertisements from their branded channels, rather than paying fees. influencers to post on their own feeds, explains Emily Hall, campaign manager at the marketing agency. Goat, which has offices in London, New York and Singapore. By acquiring usage rights, brands can choose captions that best match their tone of voice or produce different cuts and edits of content to be posted to the social network they deem most effective, with metrics available. “It gives brands an element of control,” says Hall.

Organic influencer content typically costs 5% more, but acquiring usage rights can cost 20-30% more than the original fee. “It’s still great value for money,” says Hall. “Influencers always create content and do the heavy lifting for brands. “


Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/how-deepfakes-could-change-fashion-advertising/feed/ 0
Pandemic accelerates power shift in fashion and advertising | Way of life https://ozspringfield.com/pandemic-accelerates-power-shift-in-fashion-and-advertising-way-of-life/ https://ozspringfield.com/pandemic-accelerates-power-shift-in-fashion-and-advertising-way-of-life/#respond Tue, 18 Aug 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/pandemic-accelerates-power-shift-in-fashion-and-advertising-way-of-life/ NEW YORK – The pandemic has accelerated a power shift in fashion and advertising, with models and influencers out of necessity exerting more control over their own images during remote photo and video shoots. Modeling agencies are asking companies to ship clothes directly to models, advertisers are crowdsourcing video campaigns, and creative directors are finding […]]]>

NEW YORK – The pandemic has accelerated a power shift in fashion and advertising, with models and influencers out of necessity exerting more control over their own images during remote photo and video shoots.

Modeling agencies are asking companies to ship clothes directly to models, advertisers are crowdsourcing video campaigns, and creative directors are finding innovative ways to choose their best shots on Zoom.

Julia Haart says her Elite World Group, which manages more than 4,000 fashion talent globally, pivoted during the height of the pandemic to survive, when mainstream filming was impossible due to travel restrictions and distancing social.

She contacted brands like Urban Outfitters, Zara and Madewell directly, urging them to send clothes, jewelry and handbags to her models. And she brought in models to show off their personalities when shooting the products themselves.

“Think of the world of traditional models, who ruled the world: it was the photographers, the videographers, it was the magazine editors,” she said. “Now, with social media, with the digital space, it’s the talent that goes directly to people. It’s democratized fashion.”

The model Héloïse Guérin has experienced it, even fully realizing some of her shoots. The products were shipped to her home where she and her husband, photographer Victor Demarchelier, would shoot.

“Even though we’ve had a lot of Zoom meetings with clients, they still left us a lot of room for the creativity and freedom that we really appreciated,” she said in an email to the Associated Press. “It was so much more fun than being ‘just a role model’ and it was very rewarding.”

While Guérin is uniquely positioned to create a quality product with a professional photographer under its roof, not all models are so lucky.

Haart says less than half of the models it manages have had the opportunity and ability to shoot their own material. Nonetheless, she considers the move towards models with more control over their personal brand to be sustainable, so she continues to move in that direction, even though some models are starting to return to the studio.

“I don’t want to be a Blockbuster,” she said. “I want to be Netflix.”

It was this same attitude that led Amy Zunzunegui to change her strategy as she prepared to launch her skincare brand, WLDKAT.

When the pandemic forced her to cancel her planned launch event, she instead mounted a self-touring video campaign featuring 14 women using her products.

“We gave them pictures and a kind of vibe and energy. And they did it in a silo in their own natural habitat with their own equipment,” she said. “And what’s so cool is we’ve been allowed to give these content creators a voice.”

The adaptation or death mentality extended beyond modeling and advertising, touching the music and film industry as well.

Quinn XCII used a Zoom collaboration to make her voice heard during the pandemic. The singer-songwriter partnered with director Blythe Thomas to create a music video for her song “Coffee” using Zoom footage, security cameras and other videos shot by the woman. by Quinn XCII.

Thomas shot the video from New York while Quinn XCII shot from his home in Los Angeles. It took longer than expected. “We had a call the day before, we were like, ‘Oh, this will be a five, four hour shoot,’” Thomas said. “And then it was like a two o’clock shoot.”

Others who have shot and shot remotely, like photographer Cedrick Jones, agree that collaborating on Zoom and FaceTime can take time. When taking FaceTime portraits of models, musicians and actors, Jones helps them find the right lighting in their home and shows them where to place their phones to get the perfect shot.

“The response has been cool,” he said. “I’m still shocked at what I can get.”

For him, the shift to remote work was not necessarily a career decision, but a creative one.

“You just feel like a painter,” he said. “You have to paint something.”

While artists and creatives are content with remote work, some, like “Riverdale” star Cole Sprouse, have tried to avoid the Zoom and FaceTime workaround altogether.

“I think at first when it was a novel it looked really interesting, but I think it got oversaturated,” Sprouse said. “But I think the way people manage to shoot and stay safe is intriguing.”

It is difficult to know what the lasting impact will be on these industries. Jones and Thomas predict smaller crews for photography and videography shoots. Guérin plans occasional remote filming even in a post-pandemic world.

But while creatives are content with working remotely, Thomas said she lacked the comforts of a music video set, especially for a second Quinn XCII music video she directed, a ballad titled “Second Time Around. “which emphasizes self-forgiveness.

“When something is a little more serious in the content as a director, you absolutely want to be there and, for example, protect things for the artist,” Thomas said. “There is something to be said for these established days when you have all the bells and whistles you need.”

Quinn XCII was pleased with the results, which he said show “we can still be creative ourselves, even with these limitations”.


Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/pandemic-accelerates-power-shift-in-fashion-and-advertising-way-of-life/feed/ 0
Pandemic accelerates power shift in fashion and advertising https://ozspringfield.com/pandemic-accelerates-power-shift-in-fashion-and-advertising/ Tue, 18 Aug 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/pandemic-accelerates-power-shift-in-fashion-and-advertising/ NEW YORK – The pandemic has accelerated a power shift in fashion and advertising, with models and influencers out of necessity exerting more control over their own images during remote photo and video shoots. Modeling agencies are asking companies to ship clothes directly to models, advertisers are crowdsourcing video campaigns, and creative directors are finding […]]]>

NEW YORK – The pandemic has accelerated a power shift in fashion and advertising, with models and influencers out of necessity exerting more control over their own images during remote photo and video shoots.

Modeling agencies are asking companies to ship clothes directly to models, advertisers are crowdsourcing video campaigns, and creative directors are finding innovative ways to choose their best shots on Zoom.

Julia Haart says her Elite World Group, which manages more than 4,000 fashion talent globally, pivoted during the height of the pandemic to survive, when mainstream filming was impossible due to travel restrictions and distancing social.

She contacted brands like Urban Outfitters, Zara and Madewell directly, urging them to send clothes, jewelry and handbags to her models. And she brought in models to show off their personalities when shooting the products themselves.

“Think of the world of traditional models, who ruled the world: it was the photographers, the videographers, it was the magazine editors,” she said. “Now with social media, with the digital space, it’s the talent that goes straight to people. He democratized fashion.

The model Héloïse Guérin has experienced it, even fully realizing some of her shoots. The products were shipped to her home where she and her husband, photographer Victor Demarchelier, would shoot.

“Even though we’ve had a lot of Zoom meetings with clients, they still left us a lot of room for the creativity and freedom that we really appreciated,” she said in an email to the Associated Press. “It was so much more fun than being ‘just a role model’ and it was very rewarding.”

While Guérin is uniquely positioned to create a quality product with a professional photographer under its roof, not all models are so lucky.

Haart says less than half of the models it manages have had the opportunity and ability to shoot their own material. Nonetheless, she considers the move towards models with more control over their personal brand to be sustainable, so she continues to move in that direction, even though some models are starting to return to the studio.

“I don’t want to be a Blockbuster,” she said. “I want to be Netflix.”

It was this same attitude that led Amy Zunzunegui to change her strategy as she prepared to launch her skincare brand, WLDKAT.

When the pandemic forced her to cancel her planned launch event, she instead mounted a self-touring video campaign featuring 14 women using her products.

“We gave them images, a kind of atmosphere and energy. And they did it in a silo in their own natural habitat with their own equipment, ”she said. “And what’s great is we’ve been allowed to give these content creators a voice. “

The adaptation or death mentality extended beyond modeling and advertising, affecting the music and film industry as well.

Quinn XCII used a Zoom collaboration to make her voice heard during the pandemic. The singer-songwriter partnered with director Blythe Thomas to create a music video for her song “Coffee” using Zoom footage, security cameras and other videos shot by the woman. by Quinn XCII.

Thomas shot the video from New York while Quinn XCII shot from his home in Los Angeles. It took longer than expected. “We had a call the day before, we were like, ‘Oh, this will be a five, four hour shoot,’” Thomas said. “And then it was like a two o’clock shoot.”

Others who have shot and shot remotely, like photographer Cedrick Jones, agree that collaborating on Zoom and FaceTime can take time. When taking FaceTime portraits of models, musicians and actors, Jones helps them find the right lighting in their home and shows them where to place their phones to get the perfect shot.

“The response has been cool,” he said. “I’m still shocked at what I can get.”

For him, the shift to remote work was not necessarily a career decision, but a creative one.

“You feel like a painter,” he said. “You have to paint something.”

While artists and creatives are content with working remotely, some, like “Riverdale” star Cole Sprouse, have tried to avoid the Zoom and FaceTime workaround altogether.

“I think at first when it was new it looked really interesting, but I think it got oversaturated,” Sprouse said. “But I think the way people manage to shoot and stay safe is intriguing.”

It is difficult to know what the lasting impact will be on these industries. Jones and Thomas predict smaller crews for photography and videography shoots in the future. Guérin plans occasional remote filming even in a post-pandemic world.

Thomas said she missed the comforts of a set of clips, especially for a second clip of Quinn XCII she directed, a ballad titled “Second Time Around” that emphasizes self-forgiveness. .

“When something is a little more serious in the content as a director, you absolutely want to be there and, like, protect things for the artist,” Thomas said. “There is something to be said for these established days when you have all the bells and whistles you need.”

Quinn XCII was pleased with the results, which he said show “we can still be creative ourselves, even with these limitations”.


Source link

]]>
“Italians are back”: fashion advertising comes back to life for publishers https://ozspringfield.com/italians-are-back-fashion-advertising-comes-back-to-life-for-publishers/ https://ozspringfield.com/italians-are-back-fashion-advertising-comes-back-to-life-for-publishers/#respond Wed, 22 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/italians-are-back-fashion-advertising-comes-back-to-life-for-publishers/ Fashion brands are starting to strut their stuff again. Three months after the coronavirus halted the industry in its tracks, fashion brands are starting to spend on advertising again, not only to promote the fall and winter lines currently in production, but to capitalize on pent-up demand for consumers as stores begin to reopen and […]]]>

Fashion brands are starting to strut their stuff again.

Three months after the coronavirus halted the industry in its tracks, fashion brands are starting to spend on advertising again, not only to promote the fall and winter lines currently in production, but to capitalize on pent-up demand for consumers as stores begin to reopen and hopefully. boost sales of inventory that brands couldn’t move earlier in the year.

Publishers will take the bright spots wherever they can find them. But the budgets that have been released are more focused on results, the editors said, and some say they expect the recent trend for fashion brands to do larger campaigns with fewer partners to accelerates this year.

“The Italians are back,” said Joshua Brandau, Los Angeles Times chief revenue officer, “Fashion houses are questioning big, bold executions, section buyouts and robust cross-platform packages. About the vertical.

For context, apparel and retail apparel advertisers spent $ 4.75 billion on advertising in 2019, according to Kantar.

The coronavirus has hit the fashion industry with a difficult combination of punches. Blockages around the world, not only in China but in Italy and France, suddenly halted production at many factories and fashion house retailers. unable to sell online or in person, briefly wholesale orders canceled they had placed with brands, leaving them millions of dollars in products they had no way of selling.

Adding insult to injury, social distancing regulations in cities like New York and Los Angeles meant brands and their agencies couldn’t muster the teams needed to create the sleek, stylish ads they had. used to show consumers.

“You’ve had a lot of brands that have been creative [assets] since last year, they’ve had to find a way to reorganize and reuse, ”said Addia Cooper-Henry, founder of creative agency VMGroupe.

As a result, fashion brands’ advertising spending plunged in March and continued; Overall, ad spend in the category was down 45% year-over-year in the second quarter. This is due in large part to the decline in print ads, which account for 64% of the category’s spend, by Mediaradar.

But other types of ad purchases have also slipped precipitously. Excluding print ads, year-over-year spending in the category fell from a 6% rise in mid-March to a drop of more than 15% in about a month, according to Mediaradar’s analysis carried out for this article. By mid-June, spending had fallen more than 20% year-over-year, according to this analysis.

Shayna Kossove, director of revenue for fashion and lifestyle publication WhoWhatWear, said most of her clients took a break rather than write off their spending as they tried to figure out what to do. But even as her clients hatched new plans, Kossove said she and her team went weeks without launching new business because buyers were so hesitant. In some cases there was no one to throw.

“In many cases, our customers [contacts] have been put on leave or even fired, ”Kossove said. “It was like, ‘Who are you even calling? “”

Yet in May, conversations began. “The fall conversations have
happened, ”Kossove said. “They really picked up in the last month.”

Some of the recent spending appears designed to capitalize on pent-up consumer demand. Early returns from big box stores opened last month suggest there is some measure of pent-up consumer demand for brands to capitalize.

Publishers who are able to offer an affiliate or performance component to their campaigns are better positioned than those who only offer media. Yuriy Boykiv, president of DentsuX, said that while some fashion brands are still “calibrating” their spending, spending on digital and e-commerce has increased.

Most of the conversation, however, centers around the fall season, Brandau said. While publishers remain wary of retail as a category, they are eager to have conversations about the second half of the year. And fashion advertisers, for now, seem open to having them – despite the growing threat of coronavirus in America’s solar belt.

“I would say that in Q4 we will come back to the numbers we were hoping for,” Kossove said. “We will probably be even closer to the old forecast.”


Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/italians-are-back-fashion-advertising-comes-back-to-life-for-publishers/feed/ 0
Ecological or falsely advertised? Sustainable fashion advertising in Europe: dos and don’ts https://ozspringfield.com/ecological-or-falsely-advertised-sustainable-fashion-advertising-in-europe-dos-and-donts/ https://ozspringfield.com/ecological-or-falsely-advertised-sustainable-fashion-advertising-in-europe-dos-and-donts/#respond Wed, 04 Dec 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/ecological-or-falsely-advertised-sustainable-fashion-advertising-in-europe-dos-and-donts/ Sustainable fashion is all the rage and chain stores are too eager to cater to consumers who want to shop in a more environmentally friendly way. “Sustainable”, “ecological” and “ecologically ethical” are words that we see appearing more and more often in fashion advertising. But are these clothes and materials really respectful of the environment? […]]]>

Sustainable fashion is all the rage and chain stores are too eager to cater to consumers who want to shop in a more environmentally friendly way. “Sustainable”, “ecological” and “ecologically ethical” are words that we see appearing more and more often in fashion advertising. But are these clothes and materials really respectful of the environment? Or is it just a practical marketing tool (called greenwashing)? In this article, we’ll take a closer look and give some practical legal guidelines for sustainable fashion advertising.

Greenwash or not greenwash? Problems with advertising for sustainable materials in Europe

A study by the European Commission (“Consumer market research on environmental claims for non-food products”, 2014) shows that green claims and misleading marketing are occurring in the European fashion industry. Some fashion companies claim that their clothes are made of durable materials. The central problem, however, is that no European legal standard has been established to verify sustainability claims. In addition, there is no guidance to consumers and other market players as to what exactly is meant by so-called “sustainable” materials and how they can be verified. Without these standards, consumers might consider a garment to be more environmentally friendly than it actually is. For example, some collections claim to be “sustainable” fashion because they are made from 100% cotton, Tencel or recycled polyester. Therefore, when ‘green claims‘are made in a sector, the question of false advertising arises.

European ban on false advertising for sustainable materials

False advertising is classified by European law as an unfair market practice and is prohibited. A market practice is considered misleading when it contains false information and statements. Advertising is also considered to be misleading if it misleads or is likely to mislead the average consumer as to the main characteristics of the product (such as its benefits, composition or process) influencing the consumer’s decision to make a purchase that he does not want. otherwise would not have done, even if the information is factually correct.

The ” Compliance criteria on environmental claims,‘published in 2016, requires market players to present their environmental claims in a precise, precise and unambiguous manner. In order to comply with these criteria, advertisements for environmental claims must avoid vague wording or, in the case of general wording, sufficiently substantiated claims.

In practice, an advertisement for supposedly sustainable fashion items must contain the following information:

  • The words “made with recycled materials” must be clear and clearly visible;
  • The trader must be able to prove that the entire product, with the exception of minor secondary components, is made from recycled materials;
  • In general, the recycled material should make the product more environmentally friendly, creating an overall environmental benefit;
  • The context of the ad does not imply any other misleading claims.

In addition, companies must be prepared to provide scientific evidence in a clear manner if a claim is challenged.

Possible solution: the European certification mark

One possible solution for this is a certification mark. A certification mark is a mark that indicates a certain characteristic of products or services of different companies. It usually takes the form of an agreement between a group of industry participants and ensures that the goods or services meet a certain standard, regardless of which company produces the goods or services. By analogy, “Fairtrade”, a label that allows consumers to easily identify products whose ingredients are fair trade.

In the context of the fashion industry, the merit of a certification mark could therefore be to reassure consumers that certain garments are truly environmentally friendly or have certain clearly verifiable ecological characteristics. However, to date, such a guarantee or certification mark is not yet available in Belgium. In Germany, the first pilot project of the German authorities to award a “Grüner Knopt” for textile products meeting certain social and environmental requirements was launched in September 2019.

Conclusion

In anticipation of a possible certification mark, industrial players in the European Union would do well to provide more information on the qualities they promise. Consumers, for their part, are urged to remain vigilant and critical of promising advertisements. To this end, they may already rely on existing organizations or applications (such as “Good on You” and “Store a Brand”) that educate consumers about, among other things, the green efforts of certain fashion brands.

This post originally appeared in FashionUnited.


Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/ecological-or-falsely-advertised-sustainable-fashion-advertising-in-europe-dos-and-donts/feed/ 0
Pixel-accurate models: virtual influencers could be the future of fashion advertising https://ozspringfield.com/pixel-accurate-models-virtual-influencers-could-be-the-future-of-fashion-advertising/ https://ozspringfield.com/pixel-accurate-models-virtual-influencers-could-be-the-future-of-fashion-advertising/#respond Tue, 09 Jul 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/pixel-accurate-models-virtual-influencers-could-be-the-future-of-fashion-advertising/ One of the reviews listed on the Rotten Tomatoes website for the sci-fi comedy-drama, S1m0ne, says, “[The movie] fails on all points of plot, characterization, plausibility and realism… ”The consensus of critics on the site echoes this statement. “Satire in S1m0ne lacks bite, and the plot isn’t believable enough to feel relevant. S1m0ne, released 17 […]]]>

One of the reviews listed on the Rotten Tomatoes website for the sci-fi comedy-drama, S1m0ne, says, “[The movie] fails on all points of plot, characterization, plausibility and realism… ”The consensus of critics on the site echoes this statement. “Satire in S1m0ne lacks bite, and the plot isn’t believable enough to feel relevant.

S1m0ne, released 17 years ago, is about the creation by a filmmaker (played by Al Pacino) of a computer-generated actress (Rachel Roberts), whom audiences believe to be real. The actress becomes more popular than her creator, which annoys the latter.

It can no longer be argued that a computer generated human-like personality cannot be more popular than a real person. Because, well, that’s precisely what’s going on with Lil Miquela, Shudu, Liam Nikuro and a few others.

With Instagram followers ranging from over 100,000 to over 1 million, there is a prediction that these personalities – made up of finely crafted pixels – will be the future of fashion advertising. Social media influencers – highly-followed people who can impact lifestyle decisions – have been around since almost the days of the social media boom, at the turn of the decade. Many bloggers, vloggers, and online entrepreneurs are great social media influencers. Brands, especially in fashion, are turning to these influencers for better reach. But the problem with these influencers is that brands can’t fully control their actions. If one of their acts annoys the public, the brand could also be criticized.

But what if you can have an influencer, whose actions you can fully (or primarily) control? This is one of the main draws of virtual social media influencers. The idea of ​​a social media influencer – although a strange quirk at the intersection of fashion, commerce, and advertising – isn’t viral. The best known are about a handful.

Virtual celebrities

  • @lilmiquela (Lil Miquela), Instagram followers: 1.6M
  • Miquela Sousa, better known as Lil Miquela, is arguably the most popular virtual influencer on social media. Created by tech design firm Brud, Miquela is projected as a 19-year-old Brazilian-American fashionista and music artist. She has released several singles since her debut with ‘Not Mine’.
  • @ shudu.gram (Shudu), Instagram followers: 177K
  • Shudu, dubbed the world’s first digital model, is arguably the most human of all virtual influencers, with skin pores, stray strands of hair and everything. Shudu is also perhaps the most controversial of her peers as she is a dark-skinned model created by 28-year-old white man Cameron-James Wilson.
  • @ blawko22 (Blawko), Instagram followers: 136K
  • Blawko, unlike Shudu, can easily be identified as a 3D model. Sporting a buzz cut and tattoos on his face, he looks like a video game character. Blawko’s biggest draw is her face, which in the year and a half of being on Instagram has only been partially revealed.

How do they work?

Although some virtual influencers suggest that these are creations of AI and / or robots, they are just 3D puppets with their invisible chains carefully manipulated by a generally low-key CG-artist. Unlike the character of Al Pacino in S1m0ne, the artist here is happy to take the back seat – at least that’s how it is so far. That said, a lot of money is at stake when it comes to virtual influencers. According to TechCrunch, the creators of Lil Miquela in January closed a $ 125 million investment round led by Spark Capital. Juniper Research estimates that the global fashion industry, perhaps inspired by the tremendous success of artificial models, will invest $ 3.6 billion in artificial intelligence technology this year.

The concept of virtual influencers has not made its mark in India. The reason is not easily identifiable. “It’s confusing, isn’t it?” But I don’t think virtual influencers will be a thing in India, ”says Riaan George, editor-in-chief of Business Traveler India and social media influencer with over 35,000 followers on Instagram. “We are now very advanced in technology. So if we were to adopt this, we would have done it already, ”he says.

Blogger and other influencer Swathi Mukund (with over 59,000 Instagram followers) believes Indians will relate to a real person rather than a fabricated character. “For example, I can inspire my followers by posting videos of my run… They know where I’m going to run. I can meet my followers face to face. They know I’m real and it helps them identify with me. I don’t know if it will be the same with a virtual person, ”she said.

As George says, “It will be interesting if they come to India.”

Play-by-plays of technology concepts the size of a byte


Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/pixel-accurate-models-virtual-influencers-could-be-the-future-of-fashion-advertising/feed/ 0
The year of undisclosed fashion advertising and the FTC https://ozspringfield.com/the-year-of-undisclosed-fashion-advertising-and-the-ftc/ https://ozspringfield.com/the-year-of-undisclosed-fashion-advertising-and-the-ftc/#respond Fri, 15 Dec 2017 08:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/the-year-of-undisclosed-fashion-advertising-and-the-ftc/ image: Le21eme.com 2017 was an important year for Truth in advertising efforts. After targeting social media stars and celebrities with “educational” letters outlining the publication requirements of its sponsored publications, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) – the government agency responsible for promoting consumer protection and ‘Eliminate and Prevent Anticompetitive Business Practices – issued additional disclosure […]]]>

image: Le21eme.com

2017 was an important year for Truth in advertising efforts. After targeting social media stars and celebrities with “educational” letters outlining the publication requirements of its sponsored publications, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) – the government agency responsible for promoting consumer protection and ‘Eliminate and Prevent Anticompetitive Business Practices – issued additional disclosure guidelines, and settled a formal investigation it opened against two YouTube influencers.

Here’s a look at some of the major developments of the year in this space, as well as some of the journalistic efforts TFL has undertaken to shed light on this important area which concerns not only the requirements of federal law, but rights as well. of consumers….

1. The FTC is taking action against influencers and marketers on sponsored posts. In a landmark activity episode, the FTC announced that it is actually monitoring celebrities, athletes and other influencers on Instagram. According to a government agency statement, after reviewing Instagram posts from celebrities and influencers, its staff sent over 90 letters reminding influencers and marketers to clearly and visibly disclose their relationships. when promoting or endorsing products through social media.

1a. FTC Clarifies Rules, Sends Stronger Letters to Influencers and Celebrities. The FTC settled its very first case against individual social media influencers and sent a fresh batch of letters to nearly two dozen others.

2. The Federal Trade Commission answers common questions specific to influencers. In the wake of these increased actions involving social media influencers, the FTC hosted an influencer-specific session on Twitter to answer questions about how brands and influencers can ensure they comply with US laws. . The FTC’s questions and answers – including hints as to whether Instagram’s new “paid partnership” feature is a valid disclosure (hint: it probably isn’t) – are as follows.

3. In light of the continuing violations, what was the real effectiveness of the FTC letters? Who’s Afraid of the FTC? Few celebrities, influencers or fashion brands. With that in mind, the ramifications – or lack thereof – of the letters the FTC sent to brands and individuals challenging allegedly undisclosed sponsored posts on Instagram are certainly interesting.

4. Revolve built a nearly $ 1 billion business based on undisclosed influencer marketing. For Revolve – which was founded in 2003 by Michael Karanikolas and Michael Mente, both from tech, not fashion – influencer marketing is big business. According to Mente, up to 70% of Revolve’s revenue – $ 400 million in 2015 – comes directly from influencer support. And yet, you won’t be able to gauge this just by looking at photos that have Revolve hashtags on them. This lack of clear and visible disclosure is problematic when compared to federal truth in advertising laws in the United States and internationally.

5. The annual report on the brand and influencers: the good, the bad and the very problematic. The following list takes into account 19 of the most famous influencers in the industry – from the biggest names, such as Chiara Ferragni and Julie Sariñana, to the slightly less followed but still very notable, like Marianna Hewitt and Gala Gonzalez, as well as the brands they are associated with.

6. Brands and influencers are divided when it comes to sponsorship disclosures. It’s been several months since the FTC sent a strong message to influencers, celebrities and brands by sending out approximately 90 letters focusing on the required use of disclosures in relation to sponsored content, and garnering extensive media coverage in the process. Regardless of whether a business or individual has received a warning letter, the FTC’s ruling means that the government organization pays attention to sponsored content, especially on Instagram, and advertising / endorsement entities must take note of it.

7. What is really driving Instagram’s push for advertising disclosures? Calling it “a step towards transparency,” Instagram’s new disclosure option is likely a legal measure calculated to help the platform evade responsibility if – or when – the FTC decides to crack down not just on influencers. flouting the truth in advertising standards, but also secondarily. responsible platforms as well.

8. Not just an American issue, UK brands, influencers and publications also need to be disclosed. Social media influencers, publications and the brands they are associated with are finally called on on a larger scale for non-disclosure of material links, with the FTC in the US and the Advertising Standards Authority in the UK slowly starting to crack down on ethically questionable and often deceptive practices.

9. Why isn’t the FTC doing more to tackle undisclosed ads in fashion? With increasingly frequent warning messages and a lack of real enforcement action, the question remains: why isn’t the FTC really taking action? (Chances are he’s understaffed and busy with other more “pressing” issues, such as allegedly anti-competitive mergers of multi-billion dollar companies and endorsements involving pharmaceuticals.)

ten. Advertising or editorial: it’s the same in fashion. Vogue Arabia’s September cover was essentially an undisclosed ad. The preference of publishers to favor advertisers is certainly not a new practice in the fashion industry, but it nevertheless seems, for lack of a better word, disgusting, due to the lack of transparency that accompanies it. . Read: The average consumer – those whom advertising laws and journalistic ethics standards aim to protect – would otherwise have no idea.

11. Full fashion disclosure – or not. While much has been written about how the agency’s recent efforts may affect influencers and celebrities who get paid to promote specific products or brands in subtle ways, the FTC has made it clear that it has all areas of the fashion industry in the crosshairs. In other words, someday soon, the cover of the show you’re reading – in a glossy magazine, on a website, in an app – might look a little different.

12. Why does the fashion industry view truth in advertising as optional? For an industry that talks a lot about transparency, fashion regularly fails. This is demonstrated every time a publication presents a product that has been offered to them in exchange, of course, for preferential placement. The same can be said when brands ask editors to attend lavish events and distant preseason or couture shows, or when influencers endorse the giveaways they receive from brands without stating the true nature. of these articles.

13. Red Carpet Pay-for-Play and the legality of designer approvals. An interesting aspect of the red carpet that is often lost to the industry underdog is the secret, paid-for deals between celebrities and their stylists, and the fashion brands that perform and allow certain dresses to make it to those carpets. very noticeable reds instead. others. Such agreements, while otherwise perfectly legal, can venture into legal trouble territory because of federal truth in advertising laws.


Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/the-year-of-undisclosed-fashion-advertising-and-the-ftc/feed/ 0
Fall fashion advertising more diverse than runway shows for the first time https://ozspringfield.com/fall-fashion-advertising-more-diverse-than-runway-shows-for-the-first-time/ https://ozspringfield.com/fall-fashion-advertising-more-diverse-than-runway-shows-for-the-first-time/#respond Tue, 29 Aug 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://ozspringfield.com/fall-fashion-advertising-more-diverse-than-runway-shows-for-the-first-time/ While fashion has always been, and most continues to be, predominantly white, we are slowly striving to rewrite the narrative – one color model at a time. Those who push for different races on the podium achieve excellent results – the tracks of spring 2017 were the most diverse fashion has seen it – and […]]]>

While fashion has always been, and most continues to be, predominantly white, we are slowly striving to rewrite the narrative – one color model at a time.

Those who push for different races on the podium achieve excellent results – the tracks of spring 2017 were the most diverse fashion has seen it – and it now seems like brand marketing teams are similarly learning their clothes don’t just appeal to white men and women. Indeed, according to The fashion spot, The fall 2017 campaigns exceeded the leads for most of the people of color included in the ad.

Diversity in fashion advertising cadenced at 30.4%, an improvement from spring 2017, which only saw 24.5% women of color. There were also the most transgender models included this season, according to the store, but of the top seven models in the world, only Adwoa Aboah was not white. Plus size representation saw its smallest decline in the past two years, with just 10 stars in major campaigns (2016 included 14 and 2015 saw 11 curvy models appear in the ad.)

racially, Saint Laurent, Coach, Dior, Dolce & Gabbana, Difference, Helmut Lang and Nordstrom are at the origin of the most diverse campaigns, while Helmut Lang, Sisley and Philipp Plein included the most trans women.

Let’s keep the confusion flowing, okay guys? Head to The fashion spot to read the full report.

[h/t Fashionista]
Images courtesy of Dior / Miu Miu


Source link

]]>
https://ozspringfield.com/fall-fashion-advertising-more-diverse-than-runway-shows-for-the-first-time/feed/ 0